Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

I received a few messages from Amazon begging me to go back to Audible – I’m sorry but  £7.99 for 1 audio book a month is pretty poor in my opinion. If you want to but additional books it’s anything from £5- £30!  They offered me three months at £2.99 so I’ve gone back… for now. 

I had actually bought the kindle version or Ready Player One after a recommendation from a friend, but hadn’t gotten around to reading it yet. I couldn’t really find anything that appealed, and I saw that this was narrated by Wil Wheaton so I decided to give it a go.

In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the  OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

Wade Watt’s dad was a fan of comic books,  so he deliberately bestowed his son with an alliterative name. Love it. He then died in a failed robbery.  When Wade’s mom also died he was sent to live with his aunt in the stacks. 

The stacks are the trailer parks of the future; when space started to get tight, someone came up with the genius idea of going upwards. Caravans are now stacked 20 stories high, with scaffolding  (mostly) holding them in place. 15 people live in the 4 room trailer with Wade, and he hates it. 

Wade spends most of his time in the Oasis a virtual sandbox world where all online activity now takes place, he even goes to school there. He has friends, a crush, and even though he lacks funds in the virtual world as much as in the real world, he manages to get by. 

When James Halliday the creator of the Oasis dies he leaves his belongings, including his shares in the company that built the Oasis, to the first person to solve the puzzles and find the hidden easter egg in the Oasis. The total value of the prize is 67 billion credits. 

Millions of people start to look for the egg, but after 5 years no one has gotten close to solving Halliday’s puzzle. Two main groups formed after the prize became public knowledge, Gunters and Sixers. Egg hunters (Gunters) are loyal, diehard fans of James Halliday’s work. Sixers are employers of the evils corporation IOI. If they win, they will make it so that only the well-off can afford to use the Oasis. The two sides are locked into battle against each other, then, after 5 years, Wade Watts finds the copper key. 

Many books and documentaries have been made about what happened, but none of them got it right. Wade is going to tell the truth about how he solved the first clue, and beat the evil Sixers for the first time…

This book is sooooo good! It’s full of pop culture references, nods to SciFi, 80s music, films and games. It is so much fun! Will Wheaton is the perfect narrator, and I just loved the whole thing. I would recommend the audio book over the hard copy, as the narration by Wheaton just adds something.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below. 

Cheerio!

Stephani Xxx 

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9 thoughts on “Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

  1. I’ve only read the paperback book. It is amazing.

    Question about the audio book version: Do some of the music referenced in the book get played in the background of the events happening, albeit subtly?

    I’m a huge Rush fan, so it was awesome to read that “2112” got played at that seminal moment. 😉

    Like

  2. Hmmm – not so sure – I’ve read the book a couple of times, and listened to the audiobook – I found the audiobook was slow going. I guess when we read a book, if we get into the story we speed up? Anyway – great review.

    Liked by 1 person

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