Dreamology by Lucy Keating 

I’m not going to lie, I bought this book for the cover. It is absolutely stunning. The jacket design is by Natalie Sousa, who also did the cover for Everything Everything, which is another of my favourite covers.  

From the blurb:

For as long as Alice can remember, she has dreamed of Max. Together they have traveled the world and fallen deliriously, hopelessly in love. Max is the boy of her dreams—and only her dreams. Because he doesn’t exist.


But when Alice walks into class on her first day at a new school, there he is. It turns out, though, that Real Max is nothing like Dream Max, and getting to know each other in reality isn’t as perfect as Alice always hoped.


When their dreams start to bleed dangerously into their waking hours, the pair realize that they might have to put an end to a lifetime of dreaming about each other. But when you fall in love in your dreams, can reality ever be enough?

Alice has had a pretty turbulent life; her mum left her and her dad to study monkeys in Africa when she was about 6, and she’s never really been able to forgive her. 

Both Alice’s parents are scientists and are very analytical. Alice’s Dad however tries to take an interest in her life and tries to spend a lot of time with his daughter. Alice hasn’t heard from her mum since she left, except for a few postcards about her research every now and then. 

The main loves of Alice’s life are Jerry her dog, and Max, who is literally the boy of her dreams. Ever since she can remember, Max has been with her. In her dreams Alice and Max go on epic adventures, visit amazing places and generally have a blast, which means that Alice isn’t really interested in guys outside of her dreams.

 Alice’s best friend Sophie is accepting about Alice’s dream guy, but also thinks she needs to meet someone real. 

Then Alice inherits her grandmother’s house, and moves back to Boston where  she spent the first few years of her life. Alice isn’t looking forward to starting a new school and having to make new friends, but knows that she will still have Max to talk to in her dreams.

However when she enters her new classroom she has a huge shock – Max is in her class! Alice is understandably flabbergasted and doesn’t know if she is hallucinating, going crazy or what. It doesn’t help that Max seems to have no clue as to who she is. Also, he has a girlfriend. 

Alice and Max start to get to know each other in reality, and Alice begins to realise that there is a lot about Max and his life that she doesn’t know. Alice’s dreams start to occur during her waking hours, so that she questions everything around her. 

As Alice investigates why Max is in her dreams, she discovers a lot about herself and has to make a choice between her dreams and reality. 

I quite enjoyed this book, but there were a few niggles. The dreams were beautifully written, the supporting characters of Alice’s best friend Sophie and Oliver, a pretender to her heart, were the  best characters and I loved them. 

It felt like the author just washed over the explanation about the dreams. We never really get an answer about why they were linked or how this was resolved. It also felt as if the big arguments between Alice and Max were added in just to create points of contention, especially in the last quarter of the book. It was drama for drama’s sake, made the characters look a bit stupid as well as childish, and became rather tiresome. 

Overall I gave it 3/5 stars on Goodreads. It was a quirky, enjoyable book and worth a read. 

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

Cheerio!

Stephani Xxx 

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3 thoughts on “Dreamology by Lucy Keating 

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